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Oakham School Archives

Explore the history of the school through the documents and objects that have been left behind...

Introduction

The Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve was formed in July 1936. The RAFVR was initially composed of civilians recruited from Reserve Flying Schools. The recruits were men between 18 and 25, who had been accepted for part time training as Pilots, Observers and Wireless Operators. During the war, he RAFVR was the primary means for aircrew entry to serve with the RAF. A civilian volunteer, who had been accepted for aircrew training, would take an oath of allegiance and be inducted in to the RAFVR. Then he would return to his civilian job, often for several months, until being called up for training.

Throughout the six years of the war, the RAF developed new techniques for landing troops behind enemy lines by means of parachutes or gliders. From March 1940, the RAF began to bomb targets in Germany. These bombing raids would be carried out until the end of the war. Operational flying was perilous. Aircraft were victims to flak, enemy anti-aircraft fire. Flying was demanding, both physically and mentally, as pilots and aircrew had to concentrate for many hours at a time. The unpredictable weather was also a threat to aircraft and crew had to cope with occupational hazards, such a lack of oxygen, frostbite and lower pressures. Flying at night was even more dangerous. Training had its risks as instructors were flying with inexperienced recruits in old aircraft.

The RAF and RAFVR were involved in all the main battles of the war across the globe. The British Royal Air Force defended the country against the Luftwaffe in the Battle of Britain in 1940, preventing the Germans from invading the British Isles. The RAF also played a key part in the Normandy landings in June 1944.

Casualties: about 70,000 RAF personnel were killed; 8,000 men were killed in training accidents or other non-operational flying; 51% aircrew were killed on operation; 12% were killed or wounded in non-operational accidents; 13% were captured as Prisoners of War.

Old Oakhamians who Fell in England, Scotland and Wales.

John Lewis "Jack" Baines

16th October 1913 – 18th March 1941

 

John was the son of Lt-Col J.C. and Eleanor S. Baines of Oadby, Leicestershire.

Jack (right) at school.

Life at Oakham School

Jack attended Oakham School between 1922 and 1931. He was in Junior House and then moved to School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Rugby 1st XV: Colours – Winter 1930; Winter 1931.

1930 Rugby 1st XV.

Oakham School Rugby 1st XV, 1930 - Jack is sitting bottom left.

1931 Rugby 1st XV.

Oakham School Rugby 1st XV, 1931 - Jack is sitting on the far left.

  • Cricket Under 14: Summer 1926; Summer 1927.
  • Cricket 1st XI: Summer 1931.
  • 100 yards (under 11): 2nd place – Spring 1924.
  • Quarter Mile (under 13): 1st place (741/5 sec) – Spring 1926.
  • Quarter Mile (under 13): 3rd place – Spring 1927.
  • Boxing: feather, lost the final against I.R.J. Perkins and won Mr Jerwood’s prize for the best loser – Spring 1927.
  • Form 1 English Prize: Summer 1924.
  • O.T.C.: Certificate ‘A’ – Spring 1930.
  • O.T.C.: promotion to Lance Corporal – Summer 1930.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

A keen sportsman, the Oakham Magazine commented upon his rugby prowess.

Winter 1930 Rugby Review: ‘A sound tackler who does not hesitate to go down to the ball. His fielding is definitely weak and he is slow to get to the ball. His kicking has improved, especially with the left foot.’

Winter 1931 Rugby Review: ‘Ended the season in the pack where he developed much dash. Has done good work in defence. Is still inclined to hold on to the ball too long.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Jack worked in the boot industry. He married Shirley of Bexhill-on-Sea, Sussex. He was a Pilot Officer in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. He died on active service, serving with No.2 School of Army Co-operation at RAF Andover Hampshire. He was killed in a flying accident, when he lost control of his Bristol Blenheim IV T2443 and crashed at Penton Mewbey, Wiltshire. He was 27.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Spring term 1941, Vol.56.

He is buried in grave A.43 at Oadby Cemetery, Leicestershire.

 

Bibliography

http://www.leicestershirewarmemorials.co.uk/war/casualty/view/21222

http://www.rafcommands.com/database/wardead/details.php?qnum=53440

Wilfred Bennett ‘Tom’ Beale

8th June 1898 – 4th September 1941

 

Wilfred was the son of Edgar and Edith Beale of Humberstone House, Humberstone, Leicestershire.

 

Life at Oakham School

Wilfred attended Oakham School between 1912 and 1914. He was in School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Swimming Four Lengths handicap (open): 2nd place – Summer 1913.
  • Form 3 English Prize: Summer 1913.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Wilfred was educated at Eastbourne College. He left Eastbourne in May 1914 and he enlisted in the Inns of Court O.T.C. On 1st September 1915, he received his commission with 3rd Battalion, The Buffs. He served in the First World War as a Lieutenant with the 6th Battalion. He was wounded after a few days in the trenches at Vermelles. After recovery, he was graded “fit for Home Service” and he was posted to the headquarters of MI5 in December 1916. In April 1917, he was attached to 2nd Battalion, the Leicestershire Regiment, serving in Mesopotamia. On 31st March he was posted to the Yeomanry Base Depot at Kantara and was now attached to the Royal Flying Corps at the Middle East Training Wing. After the war, he moved to South Africa where he worked as a Mining Engineer. He then came back to Britain and he became a private flying instructor pilot and joined the Auxiliary Air Force. He passed his Royal Aero Club Aviator’s Certificate on 28th June 1931.When the Second World War broke out, he became a flying instructor at the Central Flying School at Upavon. He was promoted to Deputy Chief Flying Instructor.

Wilfred was a Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force (Auxiliary Air Force).

The Royal Air Force badge.

The Royal Air Force badge.

He was gazetted temporary Squadron Leader on 10th June 1941. He was killed on active service in a flying accident while instructing Pilot Officer George Henry Brown on 4th September 1941 at Alton Barnes Relief Landing Ground. He was 43.

On 6th June 1941, he was recommended for the Air Force Cross for gallantry while flying but not on active operations against the enemy. His commendation for the medal reads, “As a Flight Commander and recently as Deputy Chief Flying Instructor of Central Flying School this Officer has performed work of outstanding merit. He has completed 1000 hours of instructional flying since June 1939 and during the past twelve months has done 600 hours giving instruction and testing pilots. He has been at CFS since August 1940 and despite his age (42) he has not spared himself and has shown marked energy and devotion to duty, setting a fine example to those who work under him.” He never received the medal personally but it was gazetted in the Third Supplement to the London Gazette, 6th September 1941.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1941, Vol.56.

He is buried in grave D.6 at Upavon Cemetery, Wiltshire.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:RAF-Badge.svg

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ezJ7V55ZkdAC&pg=PA51&lpg=PA51&dq=Wilfred+Bennett+Beale&source=bl&ots=jdatF7_92M&sig=ACfU3U3CVIJK2lgse7geJdGnj7yUhAwvVg&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi-u4DK2ZrpAhWCShUIHZxVD2UQ6AEwBHoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false

Peter Gascoyne Beard

24th September 1915 – 6th August 1941

 

Peter was the son of Rev. Hugh Spencer and Winifred Amy, née Parr, of Palmerston North, New Zealand. His father was the vicar of St Peter’s Church, Palmerston.

Peter (far left) at school in July 1934.

Life at Oakham School

Peter attended Oakham School between 1929 and 1934. He was in School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Drama: played Betsy in Eldorado by Bernard Gilbert with the School Players – Spring 1932.
  • O.T.C.: Certificate ‘A’ – Winter 1932; promotion to Lance Corporal – Summer 1932; promotion to Corporal – Spring 1933; promotion to Sergeant – Winter 1933.
  • House relay: run for School House A, team disqualified – Spring 1932.
  • Steeplechase: 7th place – Spring 1933.
  • Rugby 2nd lot: Captain – Winter 1932.
  • Cricket 2nd lot: Spring 1933.
  • Cricket 1st XI: Summer 1933; Summer 1934.

Oakham School Cricket 1st XI, 1933 - Peter is standing third from right.

Oakham School Cricket 1st XI, 1934 - Peter is standing third from left.

  • Prefect: Winter 1933 to Summer 1934.
  • Head Musician: Winter 1932 to Summer 1934.
  • Games’ Committee: Winter 1933 to Summer 1934.
  • Head Librarian: Winter 1933 to Summer 1934.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian Magazine made comments upon his cricketing prowess.

Summer 1933 Cricket review: ‘shows promise as a bowler with pace off the pitch and a late swerve: should develop into a bat.’

Summer 1934 Cricket review: ‘failed to fulfil last year’s promise as batsman or bowler; a good slip field.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Peter gained a Choral Scholarship to St Catharine’s College, Cambridge and he studied Classics and Geography. He accepted a position as an Assistant master at the Junior King’s School in September 1937 where he worked until July 1940.

Peter enlisted in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He was commissioned as a Sub-Lieutenant on board the HMT Agate, an anti submarine trawler. On 6th August 1941, HMT Agate was escorting a convoy from Methil to the Thames. It ran aground on Hainsborough Sands, off Cromer at 3:59am and was wrecked. Seven cargo vessels followed HMT Agate on to the sands and were torn apart by an unseasonal storm. One hundred and nine men were saved but Peter drowned. His body was never recovered. He was 25.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1941, Vol.56.

He is remembered on panel 4, column 3 on the Royal Naval Patrol Service Memorial, Lowestoft, on the memorial at St Catharine’s College and at Oakham School.

 

Bibliography

https://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?70357

Geoffrey Franklin Brittlebank

30th November 1920 – 29th September 1942

 

Geoffrey was the son of Colonel Joseph William and Maud Evelyn Brittlebank, of Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire.

 

Life at Oakham School

Geoffrey attended Oakham School between 1934 and 1937. He was in School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Scouts: Winter 1936.
  • O.T.C.: Certificate ‘A’ – Winter 1937.

After Oakham and the War

After school, Geoffrey studied at the Royal Veterinary College in London. He joined the Royal Air Force Voluntary Reserve as a Pilot Officer. He took part in the attack on the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau. He was promoted to Sergeant on 12th May 1941 (The London Gazette, 8th August 1941) and to Flying Officer on 12th May 1942 (The London Gazette, 24th July 1942).

He died in an aircraft accident, under training to become an instructor, flying a Master III W8960 at RAF Kirknewton. He was 21.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1942, Vol.57.

He is buried at Great St Mary’s Churchyard, Sawbridgeworth.

 

Bibliography

http://www.rafcommands.com/database/wardead/details.php?qnum=58464

Peter Ellingworth

19th June 1925 – 18th October 1944

 

Peter was the son of Arthur Robinson and Edith Maud Ellingworth of St Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex.

 

Life at Oakham School

Peter attended Oakham School between 1939 and 1943. He was in the Day Boys. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Cricket under 14: Summer 1939.
  • Rugby 1st XV: Winter 1942.
  • J.T.Corps: promotion to Lance Corporal – Summer 1941; promotion to Corporal – Summer 1942; promotion to Sergeant – Winter 1942; promotion to CSM – Summer 1943.
  • Games’ Committee: Spring 1943 to Summer 1943

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian Magazine commented upon his rugby prowess.

  • Winter 1942 Rugby review: ‘Came into the team as stand-off late in the season; has learnt to take his passes at speed and his handling has improved; his tackling is rather uncertain.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Peter became a midshipman in the Royal Navy Volunteer Force. He was a crew member in Landing Craft Tank 494 en route to the far East. A total of eighteen LCTs set out with operational crews, ammunition, guns, base staff and stores. LCT 494 was part of the Liverpool  Section, that joined the convoy on 16th October 1944 at 07:45am in the Irish Sea. She was attached to Nairnbank. The next day, the weather worsened quickly and visual signalling became impossible in the storm. Nairnbank reported that he had lost contact with LCT 494 on 18th October at 10:50am, and at 13:55pm, LCT 494 requested assistance. On 19th October 1944, LCT 494 was unaccounted for despite all the efforts to recover it. Peter died in the wreckage. He was 19.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1944, Vol.59.

He is remembered on panel 88, column 1 of Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

 

Bibliography

https://www.combinedops.com/9th%20LCT%20Flotilla.htm

John Hesketh Formby

21st January 1918 – 30th May 1941

 

John was the son of Hesketh and Gwladys Formby of Portsmouth.

 

Life at Oakham School

John attended Oakham School between 1931 and 1935. He was in Greylands and then moved to School House. He was a house prefect. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Sub-editor of the school magazine: Winter 1934 to Summer 1935.
  • O.T.C.: Promotion to Lance Corporal – Winter 1934; Certificate ‘A’ – Winter 1934.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, John became a Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve at St Merryn base. He served on board HMS Vulture. John died in an aircraft accident. He was on board Fairey Swordfish Mark II of 774 Squadron when it hit an overhead electric cable in Treberwith Valley. The aircraft was destroyed and all the crew was killed in the crash. John was 23.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1941, Vol.56.

He is buried in grave 3 at St Merryn Churchyard, Cornwall.

 

Bibliography

https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2948943/formby,-john-hesketh/

Gordon Allison Fraser

26th March 1922 – 14th September 1942

 

Gordon was the son of Rev. Albert Edward Fraser and Elizabeth Allison Fraser of Solihull Rectory, Warwickshire. His father had previously been the Vicar of Oakham.

 

Life at Oakham School

Gordon attended Oakham School between 1930 and 1932. He was in the Day Boys. His school achievements are listed below:

  • 100 yards handicap (junior): 1st place (36ft) – Spring 1932.
  • 220 yards handicap (junior): 1st place (18 yards) – Spring 1932.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Gordon was educated at Marlborough College.

Gordon was a Sub-Lieutenant with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He was stationed at RNAS Condor. He died in an air crash. He was 20.

He is remembered on bay 4, panel 2 at Lee-on-Solent memorial.

 

Bibliography

https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2974296/fraser,-gordon-allison/

Richard Thomas Glover

3rd August 1917 – 26th June 1940

 

Richard was the son of Norman and Gladys Glover of Brailsford, Derbyshire.

 

Life at Oakham School

Richard attended Oakham School between 1926 and 1934. He was in Junior House and then moved to Greylands and School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Relay Race (under 13): 1st place with the E team – Spring 1929.
  • Diving (under 14): 1st place – Summer 1931.
  • 120 yards hurdle (junior): 3rd place – Spring 1933.
  • High jump (junior): 1st place (4ft 8in) – Spring 1933.
  • 120 yards hurdles (senior): 2nd place – Spring 1934.
  • Swimming two lengths back stroke (senior): 1st place (63sec) – Summer 1934.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Richard joined 607 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. He became a Sergeant.

He died in an aircraft accident on 26th June 1940. He was piloting a Hawker Hurricane Mk I from RAF Usworth when the aircraft dived into the ground at Neasless Wood, near Sedgefield, County Durham. He was 22.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1940, Vol.55.

He is buried in grave O.N.3 at Thornaby-On-Tees Cemetery, Yorkshire.

 

Bibliography

https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=21902

Cecil Holmes

23rd August 1911 – 31st May 1942

 

Cecil was the son of Harry Cecil and Edith Annie Holmes.

 

Life at Oakham

Cecil attended Oakham School between 1925 and 1927. He was in Greylands. He was in the O.T.C. Unfortunately, we do not possess any more information about his achievements at school.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Cecil worked in Iron Manufacturing. He married Marjorie Kathleen Holmes of Leeds, Yorkshire. He enlisted in the Royal Air Force. He was promoted to Warrant Officer (Observer).

The Royal Air Force badge.

The Royal Air Force badge.

Cecil was on a mission to Köln and his Hampden I P5321 took off from Cottesmore at 11:06pm on 30th May 1942. On their return, they collided with a Halifax from 78 Squadron and crashed at 4:05am on 31st May 1942 near March, Cambridgeshire. He was 30.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1942, Vol.57.

He is buried in grave C.23 at Bury Cemetery, Huntingdonshire.

 

Bibliography

http://www.rafcommands.com/database/wardead/details.php?qnum=81908

Terence Lundholm

23rd May 1918 – 27th May 1942

 

Terence was the son of Torkel and Kathleen Lundholm of Bedford.

 

Life at Oakham School

Terence attended Oakham School between 1932 and 1935. He was in Wharflands. His school achievements are listed below:

  • O.T.C.: Certificate ‘A’ – Spring 1935.​
  • Swimming two lengths free style (senior): 2nd place – Summer 1935.
  • Swimming plunge: 2nd place – Summer 1935.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Terence served as a Pilot Officer with 53 OTU, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. He was killed in an aircraft accident during training. He was piloting a Spitfire K9951 and collided with Spitfire P8249 on 27th May 1942 on approach to RAF Llandow. He was 24.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1946, Vol.59.

He is buried in grave C.25 at Llantwit Major Cemetery, Glamorgan, Wales.

 

Bibliography

http://www.rafcommands.com/database/serials/details.php?uniq=K9951

George Edward Newton

13th May 1911 – 18th August 1940

 

George was the son of Edward Cecil and Gertrude Newton.

 

Life at Oakham School

George attended Oakham School between 1919 and 1928. He was in Junior School and then moved to Wharflands. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Form 1 English Prize: Summer 1921.
  • Form 2 Latin Prize: Summer 1922.
  • 100 yards (under 11): 2nd place – Spring 1922.
  • 220 yards (under 11): 1st place (35 sec) – Spring 1922.
  • Quarter-mile (under 13): 2nd place – Spring 1924.
  • High jump (senior): 2nd place (cleared 5ft) – Spring 1928.
  • Boxing: heavy weight, lost the final against A.C. Martin – Spring 1928.
  • Rugby 1st XV: awarded Colours – Winter 1927; Winter 1928.
  • O.T.C.: promotion to Corporal – Spring 1928.
  • Music: played the violin in the orchestra – Summer 1923 to Winter 1928.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian Magazine comments upon his rugby prowess.

Winter 1927 Rugby review: ‘A hard worker but rather clumsy and possessed of little speed.’

Winter 1928 Rugby review: ‘(forward) Shoved well in the scrum, but was often clumsy in the loose.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, George became a farmer. He married Doris Mary of Arrington, Cambridgeshire, and had a son. He served in the war as Flight Lieutenant (Pilot) with 218 Squadron, Royal Air Force.

The Royal Air Force badge.

The Royal Air Force badge.

His squadron was part of the Advanced Air Stricking Force and was one of the first squadron to send to France. It was evacuated to Britain on 13th June 1940. George was killed in an aircraft collision whist in training at RAF Oakington, Cambridge on 18th August 1940. During a formation exercise, two Blenheims of 218 Squadron collided with one another. George was piloting a Blenheim T1929. Overall, seven crew were killed in the accident. George was 29.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1941, Vol.56.

He is buried in grave 176 at Barrowby All Saints’ Churchyard, Lincolnshire.

 

Bibliography

http://aircrewremembered.com/wheelwright-newton.html

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:RAF-Badge.svg

John Edward Stephen

22nd April 1919 – 6th February 1944

 

John was the son of Major Edward F. and Constance Stephen of Havant, Hampshire.

 

Life at Oakham School

John attended Oakham School between 1933 and 1936. He was in School House. He was in the O.T.C. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Rugby 1st XV: Winter 1934; awarded Colours – Winter 1935.

1935 Rugby 1st XV.

Oakham School Rugby 1st XV, 1935 - John is standing on the far left.

  • Quarter-mile (junior): 3rd place – Spring 1935.
  • 100 yards (senior): 2nd place – Spring 1936.
  • Quarter-mile handicap (open): 1st place (592/5 sec) – Spring 1936.
  • Long jump (senior): 3rd place – Spring 1936.
  • Diving (senior): 1st place – Summer 1935.
  • Swimming two lengths back stroke (senior): 3rd place – Summer 1935.
  • Hockey: Spring 1936.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian Magazine commented upon his rugby prowess:

Winter 1934 Rugby review: ‘Showed dash but had little defence.’

Winter 1935 Rugby review: ‘A very fast wing forward who used his speed advantage at times in attack; could work harder in the loose and do more in defence; a powerful kick.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, John served as Warrant Officer (Pilot) with 516 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve. John died whilst in training with his squadron at RAF Connel, Isle of Coll, Inner Hebrides, Scotland. He took off from the base, flying a Hurricane Mk IIC, and was participating in a Combined Operations landing exercise in Kentra Bay. However, a thick fog on the return journey made landing difficult. John attempted to make a forced landing on the Isle of Coll but was killed when the plane struck a rock and overturned. He was 24.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1945, Vol.59.

He is buried in grave C.746 at Warblington Cemetery, Hampshire.

 

Bibliography

https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/152256

https://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/crash_sites/scotland/hawker-hurricane-lf160-isle-of-coll/

Charles Maurice Thorpe

28th October 1916 – 26th October 1939

 

Charles was the son of Charles Herbert and Annie Thorpe, of Uppingham.

 

Life at Oakham

Charles attended Oakham School between 1928 and 1933. He was in the Day Boys. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Rugby under 14: Winter 1930.​
  • Form 4 Mathematics Prize: Summer 1931.
  • Lower Form 5 Trustees’ Prize: Winter 1932.
  • Lower Form 5 Mathematics Prize: Summer 1933.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Charles went to RAF Cranwell in September 1933 as Aircraft Apprentice in Class 9. Charles served as Corporal with 13 Flying Training School, Royal Air Force.

The Royal Air Force badge.

The Royal Air Force badge.

Charles died in an aircraft accident on 26th October 1939. His Airspeed Oxford N4592 took off from RAF Drem and crashed in the Lammerlaw Hills, East Lothian. The two crew died in the crash. Charles was 22.

He is buried in grave E.1001 at Dirleton Cemetery, East Lothian.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:RAF-Badge.svg

https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/141513

http://www.rafcommands.com/database/serials/details.php?uniq=N459

Michael James West

23rd February 1919 – 31st March 1941

 

Michael was the son of William Edward and Mabel Constance West, of East Farndon, Northamptonshire.

 

Life at Oakham School

Michael attended Oakham School between 1928 and 1935. He was in Misses Daniels, and then moved to Junior House and to Wharflands. His school achievements are listed below:

  • 220 yards handicap (under 11): 3rd place (6 yards) – Spring 1929.
  • Quarter-mile handicap (open): 1st place (60 sec) – Spring 1935.
  • Cricket under 14: Summer 1932.
  • Cricket 1st XI: Summer 1935.
  • Form 2 Latin Prize: Summer 1930.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Michael worked in business with Messrs R. and W.H. Symington. He then joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in May 1939. He was commissioned Pilot Officer in probation with 14 Operational Training Unit on 2nd November 1940. Michael was in a Hampden I P2062 when it crashed whilst in training. He was 22.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1941, Vol.56.

He is buried in grave 7.1 at Cottesmore (St. Nicholas) Churchyard Extension, Rutland. Oakham School’s motto is engraved on his tombstone.

 

Bibliography

http://www.leicestershirewarmemorials.co.uk/war/casualty/view/29809

http://www.rafcommands.com/database/wardead/details.php?qnum=120478

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