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Oakham School Archives

Explore the history of the school through the documents and objects that have been left behind...

Introduction

Japan entered the war in December 1941 on the Axis side. On 7th December 1941, they launched an offensive on the American naval base of Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. In the Pacific, Japan’s aim was to control the small islands, where they would extract raw material like tin, petroleum and rubber and become self-sufficient. The British attempted to contain the Japanese conquest in the Pacific.

Hong Kong

On 8th December 1941, Japanese bombers destroyed British air power at Hong Kong. The Japanese force was of 52,000 men who launched a ground attack against the British and Canadians. The Allied troops surrendered from Kowloon Peninsula on 25th December 1941.

Casualties: 2,113 British soldiers were killed or missing; 2,300 British soldiers were wounded; 10,000 British soldiers were captured; 1,996 Japanese soldiers were killed and 6,000 were wounded.

Malaya

British, Australian and Indian troops were posted in Malaya. On 8th December 1941, the Japanese began the landings in Malaya, supported by air strikes. They overwhelmed the small Indian and Australian forced and by the end of January 1942, two Japanese divisions had occupied the entire Malaya peninsula, except Singapore Island.

Singapore

Before the war, Singapore had been a major British base in the Pacific. The Japanese landed on Singapore Island on 8th and 9th February 1942. On 15th February, the 90,000 British, Australian and Indian troops were forced to surrender. Prime Minister Winston Churchill called the defeat ‘the worst disaster in British history’. Thousands of service men were taken Prisoners of War by the Japanese. They suffered neglect and violence and worked as a labour force. The prisoners were forced to build the Burma-Thailand railway, known as the ‘Death Railway’ because of the high mortality rate.

Java

On 13th February 1942, the Japanese paratroopers landed at Palembang in Sumatra. The Battle of the Java Sea was fought between the Allied and the Japanese fleets on 27th February 1942 and lasted seven hours. The Allies lost five warships whereas one Japanese destroyer was damaged. The Japanese could then land on Java on 28th February. On 9th March 1942, 20,000 Allied troops surrendered to Japan. Java was the last target of the Japanese, who now had full control over the Pacific.

Burma

Before the war, Burma was part of the British Empire. The Japanese aimed at cutting off the Burma Road, a supply route for the Chinese, and Burma was also a gate to India. The Japanese troops entered from Thailand and captured Rangoon on 8th March 1942. Rangoon was the capital and the port of entry to the Burma Road. Moreover, the British had built a RAF base there. The newly created Allied Burma Corps lacked combat experience and adequate training and equipment and they were pushed back across the Indian frontier. By May 1942 they had walked 1,000 miles - it was the largest retreat in British history. From May 1942, both side reached a stalemate. Morale was low in the British ranks. The Allies resorted to guerrilla tactics in the jungle. 3,000 British and Ghurkha troops, nicknamed the ‘Chindits’, led by Brigadier Orde Wingate, launched Operation Longcloth. They raided behind enemy lines and sabotaged railways lines and encouraged local resistance groups.

In 1943 Lord Louis Mountbatten became Commander-in-Chief Far East and he obtained air support for the Burma Corps, now the 14th Army, comprising of British, Indian and African divisions and commanded by General William Slim. The Japanese attempted to capture the Indian cities of Imphal and Kohima. 20,000 Commonwealth troops were sent and they had the support of American Air Force planes. Between March and July 1944, a series of fierce and bloody battles were fought and the Japanese were forced back across the River Chindwin. On 4th August 1944, the Allies captured Myitkyina, a Japanese communication post and in January 1945 they reopened the Burma Road between mainland China and Burma. In early 1945, the 14th Army advanced into Burma and captured Mandalay in March. They crossed the Irrawaddy valley and retook Rangoon on 3rd May 19445.

The conditions in Burma were harsh. The soldiers suffered from the high temperatures and high humidity. Fighting was made even more difficult by monsoons and thunderstorms. They had to adapt to the mountainous terrain and combats in the jungle and they were exposed to deadly diseases, such as malaria, typhus and dysentery.

The British victory in Burma had no decisive impact in the war as a whole but it restores respect for the British troops after the humiliation of Hong Kong, Malaya and Singapore.

Casualties: the Chindits lost 818 soldiers during Operation Longcloth; the British lost 12,500 men at Imphal and 4,000 at Kohima.

A map of Burma.

Old Oakhamians who Fell in South-East Asia.

George Fletcher Beldam Archer

10th April 1912 – 7th August 1943

 

George was the son of John Fletcher and Laura Annie Archer of Bessacarr, Doncaster, Yorkshire.

 

Life at Oakham School

George attended Oakham School between 1923 and 1929. He was in Junior House, and then moved to School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Rugby under 14: Winter 1925.
  • Cricket 2nd XI: Summer 1929.
  • Fives: won the Junior Cup – Summer 1928.
  • O.T.C.: promotion to Lance Corporal – Summer 1929.
  • Debating Society: Spring 1929.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, George worked as an accountant in Saigon, Vietnam. He enlisted as a Private in the Straits Settlements Volunteer Force, 1st Battalion (Singapore Volunteer Corps).

The Singapore Volunteer Corps badge.

The Singapore Volunteer Corps badge.

He fought at the Battle of Singapore in 1942 and he was captured when Singapore surrendered on 15th February 1942. The Japanese used prisoners of war as labour force to build the Thailand-Burma railway. Two labour forces, one based in Thailand and the other in Burma worked from opposite ends of the line towards the centre. The Japanese aimed at completing the railway in 14 months and work began in October 1942. Sick prisoners from Singapore were sent to work in Thailand and Burma. These forces were known as ‘F’ and ‘H’ Force and consisted of 1,949 British, 705 Australians and 590 Dutch. George was transported by rail to Thailand as part of the ‘H’ Force on 13th May 1943. The Japanese wanted to complete the railway quickly; this meant longer working hours, more demanding work and more brutality leading to higher illness and death rates.

George died as a prisoner of war on 7th August 1943 in Thailand, at Tamarkan, a base hospital camp. He was 31.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1945, Vol.59.

He is buried in grave 2.J.28 at Kanchanburi War Cemetery, Thailand.

 

Bibliography

http://sgvolunteerscorps.blogspot.com/2013/03/0-false-18-pt-18-pt-0-0-false-false.html

Selwyn Butlin Bradfield

9th May 1920 – 15th December 1941

 

Selwyn was the son of Henry Hill and Maude Elizabeth Bradfield of Nottingham.

 

Life at Oakham School

Selwyn attended Oakham School between 1934 and 1938. He was in School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Cricket under 14: Summer 1934.
  • Cricket 1st XI: Spring 1936; awarded Colours – Summer 1937; Summer 1938.

Oakham School Cricket 1st XI, 1937 - Selwyn is standing in the centre.

Oakham School Cricket 1st XI, 1938 - Selwyn is sat second from left.

  • Cricket: played for Nottingham Public Schools – Summer holidays 1938.
  • Rugby 1st XV: awarded Colours – Winter 1937.

1937 Rugby 1st XV

Oakham School Rugby 1st XV, 1937 - Selwyn is standing on the far left.

  • Rugby: played for Nottinghamshire Public Schools – Winter holidays 1937.
  • Fives: Spring 1938.
  • Shooting: Spring 1936; Spring 1938.
  • O.T.C.: promotion to Lance Corporal – Summer 1936; promotion to Corporal – Spring 1937; promotion to Sergeant – Winter 1937; promotion to C.S.M. – Spring 1938.
  • Form 5 Prize: Winter 1934.
  • Prefect: Spring 1938 to Summer 1938.
  • Games’ Committee: Spring 1938 to Summer 1938.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian made comments upon both his rugby and cricketing prowess.

Summer 1937 Cricket review: ‘A promising batsman for next year; he has a good off-drive but is weak on the leg; a good field.’

Summer 1938 Cricket review: ‘A stylish and consistent batsman with a good off-drive; has played many useful innings; a good field.’

  • Winter 1937 Rugby review: ‘Led the forwards well; very useful in the tight and although rather slow, plays intelligently; defence fair; an excellent place-kick.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Selwyn attended RMA Sandhurst. He joined the 1st Battalion, The Leicestershire Regiment.

The Leicestershire Regiment badge.

The Leicestershire Regiment badge.

He was promoted to Second Lieutenant on 3rd July 1939 and to Lieutenant on 20th January 1940. He was also Acting Captain and temporary Captain. He was missing and presumed killed in action during the Japanese invasion of Malaya. He was 21.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1942, Vol.57.

Selwyn has no known grave. He is remembered on column 63 of the Singapore Memorial, at Kranji War Cemetery.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Leicestershire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg

William Francis Baron Briggs

5th April 1920 – 14th July 1944

 

William was the son of William and Deborah Briggs of Lightwater, Surrey.

 

Life at Oakham School

William attended Oakham School between 1934 and 1938. He was in Wharflands. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Form 5 Latin Prize: Summer 1935.
  • Higher Certificate in French: Winter 1936.
  • Prefect: Spring 1938 to Summer 1938.
  • O.T.C.: promotion to Corporal – Spring 1938.
  • Quarter Mile (junior): 2nd place – Spring 1935; 2nd place – Spring 1936.
  • 100 yards (junior): 2nd place – Spring 1935; 2nd place – Spring 1936.
  • 220 yards (junior): 1st place (282/5 sec) – Spring 1936.
  • Long jump (junior): 2nd place – Spring 1936.
  • 100 yards (senior): 2nd place – Spring 1938.
  • 220 yards (senior): 2nd place – Spring 1938.
  • Long jump (senior): 1st place (17ft 4in) – Spring 1938.
  • Cricket 2nd XI: Spring 1936.
  • Cricket 1st XI: Summer 1936; awarded Colours – Summer 1938.

Oakham School Cricket 1st XI, 1938 - William is standing on the far left.

  • Cricket: played for Richmond Public Schools and the Young Amateurs of Surrey – Summer holidays 1938.
  • Rugby 2nd XV: awarded Colours – Winter 1937.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian made comments upon his cricketing prowess.               

Summer 1938 Cricket review: ‘A good opening batsman and splendid runner between the wickets; a good left-handed field and a fair change bowler.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, William studied Economics in London. He volunteered in 1939 and was commissioned in The Royal West African Frontier Force as a Captain, 4th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry attached to 12th Battalion, Nigeria Regiment.

The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Regiment badge.

The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Regiment badge.

He was killed by friendly fire on 14th July 1944. He was 24.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1944, Vol.59.

He is buried in grave 7.D.12 at Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Oxfordshire_and_Buckinghamshire_Light_Infantry_Cap_Badge.jpg

Raymond Stuart Dennison

2nd January 1912 – 9th February 1945

 

Raymond was the son of Joseph Samuel and Kate Mary Dennison of Oakham.

 

Life at Oakham School

Raymond attended Oakham School between 1924 and 1928. He was in the Day Boys. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Rugby under 14: Winter 1925.
  • Boxing: lost the light-weights final – Spring 1927; lost 1st round in the heavy-weight category – Spring 1928.
  • House relay: won with the Day Boys – Spring 1928.
  • Lower School Drawing Prize: Summer 1926.

After Oakham and the War

After school, Raymond enlisted in the Leicestershire Regiment as a Captain.

The Leicestershire Regiment badge.

The Leicestershire Regiment badge.

His regiment was seconded to 46th Battalion, King’s African Rifles. He fought in Burma as part of the 14th Army. Raymond was killed during the Burma Campaign. He was 33.

He is remembered on panel 8 at Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar and on the Oakham Town War Memorial.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Leicestershire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg

David Dolby

28th November 1912 – 6th October 1944

 

David was the son of Albert E. and Annie M. Dolby of St Martins, Stamford.

 

Life at Oakham

David attended Oakham School between 1926 and 1929. He was in School House. At school, he was in the O.T.C. Unfortunately, we do not possess any other information on his achievements at school.

After Oakham and the War

After school, David became a farmer in Canada and worked as Director of a Printing business. He got married and had a daughter. He enlisted in the R.A.F.

The Royal Air Force badge.

The Royal Air Force badge.

He was captured in Java by the Japanese and transported by ship to a prisoner camp in Ambon. He died from dysentery as a Prisoner of war on 6th October 1944. He was 31.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1945, Vol.59.

He is buried in grave 14.B.11 at Ambon War Cemetery, on the Laitimor Peninsula, Indonesia.

 

Bibliography

https://www.roll-of-honour.org.uk/d/html/dolby-david.htm

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:RAF-Badge.svg

Stephen Gordon Humphrys

9th January 1909 – 2nd March 1942

 

Stephen was the son of Reverend Percy and Helen Humphrys of Baxterby Rectory, Atherstone, Warwickshire.

 

Life at Oakham School

Stephen attended Oakham School between 1922 and 1926. He was in School House. He gained a Certificate ‘A’. His school achievements are listed below:

  • School Certificates: Summer 1925.
  • 120 yards hurdles: 3rd place against St John’s College, Cambridge – Spring 1926.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Stephen married Betty F. of Bromley, Kent. He went to RMC Woolwich and was promoted to Second Lieutenant, Royal Corps of Signals in January 1929. He later became a Major, the Royal Corps of Signals, seconded to HQ III Indian Corps.

The Royal Corps of Signals badge.

The Royal Corps of Signals badge.

His unit was entrusted with maintaining telephone lines and operating signals equipment. Stephen died whilst escaping from the Japanese at Sumatra. He was 33.

He is remembered on column 41 of the Singapore Memorial.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ceylon_Post_%26_Telegraph_Signals_1943-45.jpg

William Henry Kingswood

3rd July 1901 – 21st April 1945

 

William was the son of William and Anna Kingswood of Hambleton.

 

Life at Oakham School

William attended Oakham School between 1912 and 1916. He was in the Day Boys. His school achievements are listed below:

  • 100 yards (under 12): 1st place (134/5 sec) – Spring 1913.
  • 220 yards (under 12): 3rd place – Spring 1913.
  • Half-mile handicap: 4th place – Spring 1913; 3rd place – Spring 1914.
  • 100 yards handicap (under 13): 3rd place – Spring 1914.
  • Cricket 1st XI: Summer 1916.

Oakham School Cricket 1st XI, 1916 - William is sitting bottom right.

  • Form 2 Trustees’ Prize: Summer 1913.
  • Senior County Council Scholarship: Summer 1914.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian Magazine commented upon his cricketing prowess.

Summer 1916 Cricket review: ’Should make a useful all-round player, with a little more confidence. An excellent out-field and fair change-bowler.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, William went to the Engine Room Apprentices School. He joined the Royal Navy and fought in the First World War. After the war, he remained in the Navy.

The Royal Navy badge.

The Royal Navy badge.

During the Second World War, he was promoted to Commander at HMS Golden Hind base and headquarters in Sydney. He suffered of a cerebral haemorrhage and died of natural causes on 21st April 1945 whilst on active service. He was 43.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1945, Vol.59.

He is buried in grave 2W.B.12 at Sydney War Memorial, New South Wales, Australia.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:British_Royal_Navy_OR-7.svg

Charrington Cecil Kirby

12th December 1912 – 5th April 1942

 

Charrington was the only son of Thomas Cecil and Mary Margaret Kirby of Pinner, Middlesex.

 

Life at Oakham School

Charrington attended Oakham School between 1927 and 1931. He was in Hodge Wing and then moved to School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • House relay: ran for Hodge Wing – Spring 1928.
  • House relay: won with School House – Spring 1929.
  • Shooting: best score on the miniature range (118 points/120) – Spring 1929; Spring 1930; took part in the Country Life Cup Competition – Spring 1931.
  • Cricket 2nd XI: awarded Colours – Summer 1931.
  • Cricket 1st XI: Summer 1931.

Oakham School Cricket 1st XI, 1931 - Charrington is standing far right.

  • Lower Form 5 English and Science Prizes: Summer 1928.
  • Music Prize: Summer 1931.
  • Head Musician: Winter 1930 to Summer 1931.
  • Prefect: Winter 1930 to Summer 1931.
  • Drama: producer of The Thread o’ Scarlet by J.J. Bell – Spring 1930.
  • Debating Society: Spring 1930.
  • O.T.C.: Certificate ‘A’ – Spring 1930; promotion to Corporal – Summer 1930; promotion to Sergeant – Summer 1931; won the Trained Men Prize on the Miniature Range – Summer 1931.

 

After Oakham and the War

Charrington came back to school in 1932 to perform Handel’s Messiah in the choir.

After school, Charrington studied Medicine at St Mary’s Hospital, London. He qualified MRCS, LRCP in 1937 and took his MB in 1938. He worked as Clinical Assistant in the Orthopaedic department at St Mary’s. He was in practice at Pinner when he was commissioned in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve in January 1940.

He served as Surgeon Lieutenant on board HMS Cornwall, a County-type Heavy Cruiser. She was deployed as flagship of 5th Cruiser Squadron, China Station with cruisers Kent, Dorsetshire and Birmingham in September 1939. In April 1942 she was deployed with Force A, escorting convoys in the Indian Ocean. She was attacked by Japanese aircraft carriers and was sunk. Charrington was declared missing, presumed killed as the result of the loss of HMS Cornwall. He was 29.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1942, Vol.57.

He is remembered on panel 66, column 1 of the Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent.

 

Bibliography

https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/1/4246/656.full.pdf

https://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono-06CA-Cornwall.htm

Charles Frederick “Paddy” Miles

7th January 1922 – 16th March 1942

 

Charles was the son of Charles and Ruth Miles of Stamford, Lincolnshire.

 

Life at Oakham School

Charles attended Oakham School between 1934 and 1937. He was in Greylands and then moved to School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Three-legged race (junior): 3rd place (paired with R.F. Guillaume) – Spring 1934.
  • Obstacle race (junior): 1st place – Spring 1935.
  • Relay race (junior): won with Greylands – Spring 1935.
  • Tug of war (junior): won with Greylands – Spring 1935.
  • Swimming obstacle race (junior): 2nd place – Summer 1937.
  • Rugby under 14: Winter 1935.
  • Scouts: Handyman badge – Spring 1936.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Charles served as Officer Cadet with the Leicestershire Regiment.

The Leicestershire Regiment badge.

The Leicestershire Regiment badge.

He was killed in action in India. He was 20.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1942, Vol.57.

He is buried in grave 8.B.6 at Kirkee War Cemetery, India.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Leicestershire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg

Donald Maitland James Murray

1st October 1899 – 19th December 1941

 

Donald was the son of Harold J.R. and Katharine Murray of Sandon Road, Birmingham.

 

Life at Oakham School

Donald attended Oakham School between 1913 and 1917. He was in School House. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Debating Society: Spring 1914 to Spring 1917.
  • Rugby 1st XV: Winter 1916; awarded Colours – Winter 1917.
  • Cricket 2nd lot: Captain of the Wasps – Summer 1917.
  • Form 5 Latin Prize: Summer 1914.
  • Form 6 Mathematics Prize: Summer 1916.
  • Form 6 Mathematics Prize: Summer 1917.
  • Higher Certificates at the Oxford and Cambridge Examination Board: Summer 1917.
  • Librarian: Spring 1917 to Winter 1917.
  • Prefect: Summer 1917 to Winter 1917.
  • O.T.C.: passed 96th in the Woolwich Examination – Summer 1917.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian Magazine comments upon his rugby prowess.

Winter 1916 Rugby review: ‘Has some pace but not a great knowledge of the game. Useful in the lineout.’

Winter 1917 Rugby review: ‘A hard-working forward in the scrum; a poor tackler.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Donald went to RMA Woolwich and became a Captain. He served in the First World War as a Second Lieutenant with the Royal Field Artillery. He married H. Neste of Bathwick Hill, Bath. When the Second World War broke out, he served with the Royal Engineers as a Major.

The Royal Engineers badge.

The Royal Engineers badge.

Donald as killed during the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong on 19th December 1941. He was 42.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Spring term 1944, Vol.59.

 

He is buried in grave 5.E.15 at Stanley Military Cemetery, Hong Kong.

 

Bibliography

https://www.roll-of-honour.org.uk/m/html/murray-donald-maitland-james.htm

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Badge,_regimental_(AM_790954-1).jpg

Ronald Herbert Roe

27th June 1914 – 14th November 1943

 

Ronald was the son of Herbert Bassett and Alice Margaret Roe of Marlow, Buckinghamshire.

Ronald at school.

Life at Oakham School

Ronald attended Oakham School between 1923 and 1932 He was in Junior House and then moved to Wharflands. His school achievements are listed below:

  • 220 yards handicap (under 13): 3rd place (28 yards) – Spring 1924; 3rd place (10 yards) – Spring 1926.
  • 220 yards handicap (under 11): 2nd place (6 yards) – Spring 1924; 2nd place (2 yards) – Spring 1925.
  • 100 yards handicap (under 11): 3rd place – Spring 1925.
  • House relay: ran in Wharflands team – Spring 1932.
  • Boxing: feather, lost his match in the house competition – Spring 1928.
  • O.T.C.: promotion to Lance Corporal – Spring 1932.
  • Royal Drawing Society Examination: passed Division II – Summer 1924.
  • Form 1 English Prize: Summer 1925.
  • Lower School Drawing Prize: Summer 1927.

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Ronald went to live in China. He served as Captain with 1st Battalion, 16th Punjab Regiment.

The 16th Punjab Regiment badge.

The 16th Punjab Regiment badge.

His battalion fought in India, Burma and the Dutch East Indies. Ronald was killed in action on 14th November 1943. He was 29.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Winter term 1943, Vol.58.

He is remembered on panel 48 of the Rangoon Memorial, Myanmar.

 

Bibliography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Badge_of_16th_Punjab_Regiment_1922-56.jpg

Peter Rook

30th June 1916 – 11th February 1942

 

Peter was the son of Maurice and Ethel Rook of Epsom, Surrey.

 

Life at Oakham School

Peter attended Oakham School between 1926 and 1934 He was in Junior House and then moved to Wharflands. He was a house prefect. His school achievements are listed below:

  • Trustees’ Lower School Drawing Prize: Summer 1929.
  • Form 4 Science Prize: Summer 1931.
  • Cricket under 14: Summer 1930.
  • Boxing: light weight, lost his match in the house competition – Winter 1932.
  • Boxing: middle weight, lost in round 1 – Spring 1933.
  • Shooting: Spring 1934.
  • O.T.C.: Certificate ‘A’ – Winter 1932; promotion to Lance Corporal – Winter 1933; promotion to Corporal – Spring 1934.
  • Photographic Society: Summer 1934.

Oakham School Magazine reviews

The Oakhamian Magazine commented on his photographs, which were presented in Summer 1935 to the Photographic Society.

Summer 1935 Photographic Society review: ‘the most attractive were ‘Dawn’, a coloured study, and ‘Sunset over San Sofia’, a picture which seemed to have captured the atmosphere of Constantinople.’

 

After Oakham and the War

After school, Peter married Helen and had a son. He served in the war as Captain with 1/5th Battalion, Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment).

The Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment badge.

The Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment badge.

His battalion fought in Belgium and France and was at Dunkirk in 1940. It was then sent to fight the Japanese in Singapore. Most of the soldiers were captured as Prisoners of war when Singapore fell. Peter died on 11th February 1942, four days before Singapore was taken by the Japanese. He was 25.

Roll of honour in the Oakhamian Magazine, Summer term 1942, Vol.57.

He is buried in grave 23.C.16-17 at Kranji War Cemetery, Singapore.

 

Bibliography

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nottinghamshire_and_Derbyshire_Mounted_Brigade_Cap_Badge.jpg

South-East Asia Images

The Japanese Army attacking Tsim Sha Tsui Station, Hong Kong, 1941.

Victorious Japanese troops celebrating the conquest of Christmas Island, off the southern coast Java, 31th March-1st April 1942. © IWM HU 2782

Soldiers of the 11th East African Division crossing the River Chindwin by ferry, December 1944.

A Royal Air Force wireless unit in North Burma arranges for food and supplies to be dropped. © IWM CF 128

The British Army in the jungle in Burma, 1944.